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Benchwarmer Baseball Rules

15.0 Player Salaries and Salary Cap

15.1 Salaries

Language slightly modified 11/29/2020

Salaries for each player are determined by their Major League statistics for the previous two seasons.  Two-thirds of the salary is based on last season completed, and the remaining third will be based upon the previous season.  This prevents a star player from becoming an outright steal following a season spent on the disabled list or having an off year.  Additionally, this prevents young or improving players from skyrocketing to the highest salary levels after only one year.

All salaries are rounded to the nearest 1000. Thus, for simplicity, all salaries and most financial figures will be displayed in thousands. For example, 250,000 = 250 and one million = 1000. Sometimes, financial values will be shown normally, for effect.
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Overall, player salaries are calculated using statistics earned in the previous season. The most important statistics are those counted in the game – thus, we don’t work with pitchers’ wins and losses, for example.

 

Following the initial calculation, the player’s salary for the new season is determined by this formula:
New Salary = (2/3 * Raw salary calculation on this year’s stats) + (1/3 * Current season’s salary)

As mentioned, this helps prevent incredibly humongous jumps for young players in their breakout seasons, plus it ensures that a veteran losing a season to injury doesn’t come back the following year at the minimum salary.

Players will have a minimum salary of 100 ($100,000).  If, in the previous equation, "New Salary" is less than 100, then the salary is bumped up to 100.

 

Finally, after the salaries are calculated, league leaders in many statistical categories and post-season awards have their salaries adjusted upward as these are premium players (described below).

 

In the calculations for salary from a given season, if a player does not have the statistics to qualify as a rookie - 130 AB or 50 IP or 45 days on a ML Roster (which might be harder to come by) - his maximum salary will be 250.  Keep in mind, that the final salary level is still an average of the results of the current season plus the previous salary.

15.2 Salary Formulas

15.2.1 Batters Salaries

Offensive Multipliers

In the salary formula below, three multipliers will be used, based on plate appearances

  • Offensive Multiplier- OM:
    • If Plate Appearances (PA) >= 600 then OM = 15
    • Else, if PA >= 300 then OM = 13
    • Else, OM = 10
  • Total Bases/Hits Multiplier - THM:
    • If PA >= 600 then THM = 2
    • Else, if PA >= 300 then THM = 1.75
    • Else, THM = 1.5
  • Runs/RBI Multiplier - RRM:
    • If PA >= 600 then RRM = 15
    • Else, if PA >= 300 then RRM = 10
    • Else, RRM = 8
Batters Salary Formula

Raw Salary = OM *( (RBI * R * RRM) + (TB * H * THM) ) – (K * 100) – (E * 150) + (SB * SB Pct. * 100) + (HR * 1000) + (PA * 1000)

Raw Salary is then divided by 1000 and rounded to the nearest integer in order to display the salary in thousands (for example, 1,500,000 becomes 1500)

 

Any salaries lower than 100 are rounded up to 100 (League minimum)

 

Any batters not reaching the rookie minimums (130 PA or 45 days on the roster, interpreted in BWB to be 35 games played) will have a maximum salary of 250. This 250 is only for the current season calculation – it still needs to be combined with the current season’s salary to set the final value.

 

One of the largest components of the salary for hitters, including the multipliers, is plate appearances, reflecting the importance of having players that are in the lineup a lot.

15.2.2 Pitchers Salaries

Pitching Multipliers

In the salary formula below, four multipliers will be used, based on games pitched (GP) or games started (GS).

  • ERA Multiplier - EM:
    • If GS >= 25 OR GP >= 60, then EM = 1,500,000
    • Else, if GS >= 10 OR GP >= 32 then EM = 1,000,000
    • Else, EM = 750,000
  • WHIP Multiplier - WM:
    • If GS >= 25 OR GP >= 60, then WM = 150,000
    • Else, if GS >= 10 OR GP >= 32 then WM = 75,000
    • Else, WM = 50,000
  • Innings Pitched Multiplier - IPM:
    • If GS >= 25 OR GP >= 60, then EM = 1.5
    • Else, EM = 1
  • Games Pitched Multiplier - GPM:
    • If GS >= 25 OR GP >= 60, then GPM = 1,000
    • Else, if GS >= 10 OR GP >= 32 then GPM = 500
    • Else, GPM = 0
Preliminary Pitching Salary Calculations
  • ERAScore = (Average ERA for all major league pitchers in the current season) / (Player’s ERA)
  • WHIPScore = (Average WHIP for all major league pitchers in the current season) – (Player’s WHIP)
Pitchers Salary Formula

If Innings Pitched <= 18 then Raw Salary = 100,000

 

Otherwise, Raw Salary = (ERAScore * EM * ( ( (IP * IPM) + (4 * Sv – (3 * BS)) + K ) / 250 ) + (G * GPM) ) ) + (WHIPScore * WM)

This number is then divided by 1000 and rounded to the nearest integer in order to display the salary in thousands (for example, 1,500,000 becomes 1500)

 

Any salaries lower than 100 are rounded up to 100 (League minimum)


Any pitchers not reaching the rookie minimums (50 IP or 45 days on the roster, interpreted in BWB to be 25 games pitched) will have a maximum salary of 250. This 250 is only for the current season calculation – it still needs to be combined with the current season’s salary to set the final value.

15.2.3 Premium Player Salary Adjustments

Following the initial salary calculations above resulting in New Salary, leaders in various statistical categories will have their salaries adjusted upward. This takes place AFTER the calculation of the BWB salary cap.


Final Salary = New Salary + (New Salary * Adjustment)

Adjustment = the sum of the following:

  • Gold Glove Winner = .05
  • Silver Slugger Winner = .03
  • Top 20 in these statistical categories will have adjustments from .020 down to .001 (First place = .020, 20th place = .001)
    • Hitters:
      • Plate Appearances, R, H, 2B, 3B, HR, RBI, BB, SB, BA*, OBP*, Slg*
      • *Using only batters qualifying for the batting title
    • Pitchers:
      • G*, GS, IP, K, Sv*, ERA**, CG, ShO, QS, Ho*, WHIP**, Opp. Avg**
      • *Since relievers will generally be only in these categories, these adjustments are multiplied by 5 (thus first place = .100 down to .005 for 20th)
      • **Using only pitchers qualifying for the ERA Title
    • Fireman of the Year* – adjustments from .10 down to .01 for the top 10 finishers in each league
      • *This rule was originally written when the Rolaids Fireman of the Year award existed through 2012. In 2013, we used the "Delivery Man Award" sponsored by DHL.  Since 2014, BWB has used the "Reliever of the Year" awards as named by MLB.
    • Cy Young – adjustments from .10 down to .01 for the top 10 finishers in each league
    • MVP – adjustments from .20 down to .01 for the top 20 finishers in each league

So, adjustments for players could rank from .1% up to 25% or more.


Note: Pitchers in MVP voting will have their Cy Young adjustments subtracted from the MVP amount.


Additionally, Relief pitchers who have Cy Young or MVP adjustments will have any adjustment from Fireman of the Year subtracted out. This prevents pitchers (particularly closers) from being priced too highly.

15.2.4 The Island of Misfit Free Agents - Salary Reduction

All players within the system (on the BWB Player List at the end of the season) that did not appear on a single BWB roster for even a single week of the regular season will have a 10% reduction in salary. At no point can a player's salary fall below the BWB minimum (currently 100).

15.2.5 Special Situations

15.2.5.1 Salary limits during calculation of current season's stats

Added for 2018 season

In the calculation of the raw salary numbers for a player (current season's stats - the basis for 2/3 of the player's next season salary), there is a maximum cap of a 10% increase compared to the player of the same type (hitter or pitcher) with the next lower salary.  There are a few parts of the salary calculation that once in a while can produce some major outliers in salary, particularly with pitchers and specifically with closers.  Rather than messing with the calculations themselves which may have unintended effects, this should help prevent the out of whack salaries such as Zachary Britton in 2017.

15.2.5.2 Salary calculation for 2-way players

Added for 2019 season

This is for 2-way players, such as Shohei Ohtani.  A player's raw salary calculation for the current season will be calculated separately as hitter/pitcher and the higher of those salaries will be used as the base.  Then, 25% of the lower salary will be added to come up with the new total.  To be honest, this is just a shot in the dark at how to do this and is subject to change.  For example, if BWB changes the way it handles bench processes and allows a 2-way player to contribute to both hitting and pitching stats in a given schedule week, then this may be revised.

15.2.5.3 Maximum salary for players who were below salary 250 in the previous season

Added 11/29/2020 to apply to 2021 salaries

In another attempt to limit bizarre and unintended massive jumps in salary from one year to the next, there will be limits on a new salary for players who had salaries below 250 in a previous season:

  1. Calculate player salaries as normal - using statistics from the current season and plugging into the equation of 2/3 of this season's stat calculation + 1/3 of the current season's salary
  2. Inspect new salaries and limit as necessary:
    1. For players with salary this year of 100, the maximum new salary will be 4000
    2. For players with salary this year between 101 and 250, the maximum new salary will be 5000
  3. If appropriate, players with limited salaries may have additional increases during the Premium Player Salary Adjustment phase
15.2.5.4 BWB Discretion to Adjust Salary

Added 11/29/2020

BWB reserves the right after all calculations are complete to further adjust player salaries.  The formulas above have worked or have been adjusted as needed for more than 20 seasons.  However, in a small number of situations, the formulas have created salaries that are simply incompatible with the salaries of the other players that season.  The side effect of that is that one player with an abnormally large salary does not significantly change the salary cap number for the season and makes that player virtually unownable unless previously signed to a contract (and affects that player's future salaries for years).

 

This is envisioned to look at salaries at the top of the scale, but BWB reserves the right to make adjustments throughout the range.

15.3 Salary Caps

15.3.1 Derivation of the Salary Cap

For now, consult the full rulebook and see Appendix D: BWB Salary Cap Calculation.

15.3. Salary Cap Distribution

The salary cap in itself is only important for first-year leagues.  Teams must create their original roster within the limit of the cap.

 

For returning leagues, the cap will represent a target cash distribution.  All teams will receive an identical amount of cash.  Once the salary cap is determined, the league will give each team the amount necessary to get the team with the smallest remaining cash balance up to the salary cap level.  Thus, teams with an advantage in cash balances will retain that edge.

 

Once the cash is distributed, teams may spend it as they wish.  There is no ceiling for total team salary - each team is limited merely by the amount of money in the bank.
 

< Previous : 14.0 Schedule and Deadlines

Top : BWB Rules Contents

Next: 16.0 Multiyear Contracts >

 
 
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